Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Kimberly Lightley Honored with 2018 LBE Award

L to R: Ted Mason, Ashleigh D'Antonia, Director Shawna Legarza, Kimberly Lightley, Monica Morrison, John Wood, Jim Shultz, and Mike Ellsworth
[L to R: Ted Mason, Ashleigh D'Antonia, Director Shawna Legarza, Kimberly Lightley, Monica Morrison, John Wood, Jim Shultz, and Mike Ellsworth]

Kimberly Lightley
Critical Incident Specialist
USDA, Washington Office
Honored for Motivation and Vision

Kimberly Lightley has been selected as one of the recipients for the 2018 Paul Gleason Lead by Example Award. Three individuals and one group from across the wildland fire service have been chosen to receive this national award.

Tuesday, February 19, 2019

Good, Better, Best

(MasterTux/Pixabay)
To err is human, to forgive divine. - Alexander Pope

When I started at the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise 18 years ago, I had a bit of an ego problem (maybe I still do). I had a resume filled with experiences that helped me land a permanent job with the wildland fire service after 15 seasons of temporary employment and a career as an educator. Along with the resume came for perfection and the need to please. My identity was tied closely to the work I produced. Find an error in the work I did and you take a hit at my character.

Monday, February 18, 2019

Challenge #3: The Art of Leadership

easel with Wildland Fire Leadership Development Program logo - Challenge #3: In your leadership journal, write your definition of "leadership."
Challenge #3: In your leadership journal, write your definition of "leadership."

IGNITE: It Doesn't Matter Who Gets Credit

“It’s amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.” ― Harry S. Truman (1884–1972)  [Photo credit: Kari Greer/USFS] (Firefighters looking towards engines)
“It’s amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.” ― Harry S. Truman (1884–1972)

[Photo credit: Kari Greer/USFS]

Friday, February 15, 2019

Blue Ribbon Staff Ride - Honoring Through Learning

participants doing the margin demonstration
Kasie Crowe and George Risko doing margin demonstration
“Put your people first - Today, Tomorrow, Forever” – Jim Karels

Thursday, February 14, 2019

The Soul of Courage

Empathy is the soul of courage. (stick person hanging from a heart)
(Credit: Dan Rockwell/Leadership Freak)

Empathy is the sould of courage.


Tuesday, February 12, 2019

Exercise: Values Exploration


John Hain/Pixabay
Values Exploration Exercise

How would you define your personal values?

Before you answer this question, you need to know what, in general, values are.
Values are what drive your decisions and actions in life.  They are qualities that are considered worthwhile and represent your highest priorities.  Values are learned through your life experiences by witnessing, imitating, and accepting/rejecting.  Values are subjective and defined by one’s self.  Your values are the things that you believe are important in the way you live. This is why making a conscious effort to identify your values is so important. When you define your values, you discover what's truly important to you. A good way of starting to do this is to look back on your life – to identify when you felt really good, and really confident that you were making good choices.
This is an exercise in getting to know who you are. Putting some time and thought into what drives you is helpful in understanding different interactions you have and how you integrate with others. It is a discretionary tool and can be accomplished with or without the content below as long as you have three (3) identified personal values listed. 

Monday, February 11, 2019

Challenge #2 - The Art of Leadership

easel and logo with challenge. (Read "Art of Leadership" (pp. 9-10) in "Leading in the Wildland Fire Service"

Art of Leadership 
Leaders deeply affect people and organizations, both positively and negatively. Accidental leaders, who have little interest or enthusiasm for leadership responsibilities or self-improvement, can inhibit people’s growth and reduce the effectiveness of their organizations.

IGNITE: Practicing is Key

The visible signs of artful leadership are expressed, ultimately, in its practice. - Max De Pree (wildland firefighters climbing stairs on a trail with packs.

The visible signs of artful leadership are expressed, ultimately, in its practice. - Max De Pree
[Photo credit: Midewin IHC]

Thursday, February 7, 2019

IGNITE: Leaders Empower Others


Leaders aren’t great because they have power. Leaders are great because they can empower. - Lolly Daskal (Crew members filling drip torches together.)
Leaders aren’t great because they have power. Leaders are great because they can empower.
 Lolly Daskal œ