Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Sight Is An Illusion

The only thing worse than being blind is having sight not no vision. – Helen Keller
To create the experience of sight, your brain references your conceptual understanding of the world, other knowledge, your memories, opinions, emotions, mental attention. All of these things and far more are linked in your brain to your sight. - Isacc Lidsky

In the fire service, we talk a lot about vision (leader's intent) and situation awareness. In this blog we are focusing on what we see and the reality each of is creating. We don't want to give too much away, so watch Isacc Lidsky's video and then dig a little deeper into the subject and discuss the video on our Facebook page when we share it there.


Living With Your Eyes Wide Open

Isacc Lidsky contends that living your life eyes wide open is a learned discipline. He provides the following strategy:
  • Hold yourself accountable for every moment, every thought, every detail.
  • See beyond your fears.
  • Recognize your assumptions.
  • Harness your internal strength.
  • Silence your internal critic.
  • Correct your misconceptions about luck and about success.
  • Accept your strengths and your weaknesses, and understand the difference.
  • Open your hearts to your bountiful blessings.
  • Let go of the excuses.
  • Search out your backwards-swimming fish.
Wildland Fire Leadership Challenge - Digging a Little Deeper
  • Using Linsky's suggestions for living a life with your eyes wide open, conduct a self-/selves-awareness check. 
  • How does fear affect command presence?
  • Was there anything mentioned in this video that will enhance your situation awareness?
  • How do the slides we have affect our decisions?
  • How are sight and vision different?
  • Download the 2017 Wildland Fire Leadership Campaign Reference Guide
    • Learn more about your self or selves.
    • Participate in the campaign with team/group/unit members.

2017 Wildland Fire Leadership Challenge logo

Monday, February 20, 2017

Respect: Know Your Subordinates and Look Out for Their Well-being

Respect: Know your subordinates and look out for their well-being.• Put the safety of your subordinates above all other objectives.
• Take care of your subordinate's needs.
• Resolve conflicts between individuals on the team.

[Photo credit: Kari Greer]

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Duty: Develop Your Subordinates for the Future

Duty: Develop your subordinates for the future. • Clearly state expectations. • Delegate tasks that you are not required to do personally. • Consider individual skill levels and developmental needs when assigning tasks.  [Photo credit: Brian Childs]
Duty: Develop your subordinates for the future.• Clearly state expectations.
• Delegate tasks that you are not required to do personally.
• Consider individual skill levels and developmental needs when assigning tasks.

[Photo credit: Brian Childs]

Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Beyond the Rose-Colored Glasses

Multiple white happy faces
(Photo credit: Creatas Images)
As part of the 2017 Wildland Fire Leadership campaign, we will focusing on authenticity. In this blog we share information about the impact a leader can have by sharing positive emotions. We challenge you to go beyond the aspect of "rose-colored" glasses and look at the science behind a mindset of positivity.
Whether or not you embrace the mindset of positivity, we challenge you to watch Barbara Fredrickson's videoes below and see how inducing positive emotions can enhance situation awareness and productivity.

Monday, February 13, 2017

Duty: Ensure that tasks are understood, supervised, and accomplished.

Duty: Ensure that tasks are understood, supervised, and accomplished. Issue clear instructions. Observe and assess actions in progress without micro-managing. Use positive feedback to modify duties, tasks and assignments when appropriate.
Duty: Ensure that tasks are understood, supervised, and accomplished.

  • Issue clear instructions.
  • Observe and assess actions in progress without micro-managing.
  • Use positive feedback to modify duties, tasks and assignments when appropriate.
[Photo credit: Kari Greer/USFS]


Thursday, February 9, 2017

Duty: Make sound and timely decisions

Duty: Make sound and timely decisions. • Maintain situation awareness in order to anticipate needed actions. • Develop contingencies and consider consequences. • Improvise within the commander's intent to handle a rapidly changing environment.  [Photo credit: Folsom Lake Hand Crew]

Duty: Make sound and timely decisions.

• Maintain situation awareness in order to anticipate needed actions.
• Develop contingencies and consider consequences.
• Improvise within the commander's intent to handle a rapidly changing environment.

[Photo credit: Folsom Lake Hand Crew]

Tuesday, February 7, 2017

Connecting through Reading


Alpine hotshots reading
(Photo credit: Alpine IHC chose Extreme Ownership as their crew book for 2016)
You have heard us say, "Leaders are readers...and writers." We have heard many of you say, "I don't like to read." or "I don't have time to read."

We challenge you take a moment to watch "How and Why We Read" and then read on.

Monday, February 6, 2017

Duty: Be proficient in your job, both technically and as a leader.



Duty: Be proficient in your job, both technically and as a leader. Take charge when in charge. Adhere to professional standard operating procedures. Develop a plan to accomplish given objectives. [Photo credit: Kari Greer/USFS]

Duty: Be proficient in your job, both technically and as a leader.
  • Take charge when in charge. 
  • Adhere to professional standard operating procedures. 
  • Develop a plan to accomplish given objectives. 
[Photo credit: Kari Greer/USFS]

Thursday, February 2, 2017

IGNITE: Trust is the Foundation

Leadership functions on the basis of trust. When trust is gone, the leader soon will be. – John C. Maxwell (Raging forest fire with torching trees)
Leadership functions on the basis of trust. When trust is gone, the leader soon will be. – John C. Maxwell
IGNITE the Spark for Leadership. LIKE and SHARE throughout your networks.
#fireleadership #fireminis

[Photo: Kari Greer/USFS, Pioneer Fire 2016]

Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Are We Hard-Wired to Fight?

I am often called the "heart" of most groups with which I associate. My compassionate nature is such that I opt for love over hate. In fact, my husband often refers to me as a "people pleaser." As with nature, I have a balance to my compassionate nature--the side that reflects the following quote:

"Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned."

While working through a few recent "fights," I came across this Crash Course episode that may shed some light on why many humans seem "hard-wired" to fight. Much like the Widlland Fire Leadership Development Program references Sun Tzu's "The Art of War" as a foundation to leadership development, I will use this video to discuss human's nature to fight--whether physical or verbal. I challenge you to take the nuggets found within the resources provided and transfer them to your self awareness pursuit as part of this year's leadership campaign The Art of Authenticity. 



Potential takeaways:
  • Aggression is an innate trait in our genes
  • "Choosing sides is the fundamental first choice that a warrior makes..." - Karl Marlentes
  • We tend to protect our kin group and pass on that behavior.
  • There is a sense of transcendence through fighting.

Wildland Fire Leadership Challenge - Digging a Little Deeper
  • Are you hard-wired for agression?
  • How is healthy conflict good for team dynamics?
  • What can you do to build team cohesion?
  • Read Sun Tzu's The Art of War.
  • Watch the History channel's documentary The Art of War
  • Gain insight into the positive side of fighting by watching Part Two: War and Civilization
  • Real Karl Marlantes book Matterhorn.