Thursday, December 29, 2016

IGNITE: Help Others Help You

You can get everything in life you want if you help enough other people get what they want.  – Zig Ziglar (Wildland firefighters watching a wildfire from afar)
You can get everything in life you want if you help enough other people get what they want. – Zig Ziglar
IGNITE the Spark for Leadership. LIKE and SHARE throughout your networks.
#fireleadership #fireminis

[Photo credit: Justin Vernon/USFS (2016)]

Tuesday, December 27, 2016

Wildland FF Health and Safety: Sleep

Rest time
Sleep 

MTDC and University of Montana researchers have been conducting human factors studies on wildland firefighters for several decades. Incident management team (IMT) members asked MTDC to study human factors associated with their duties. In 2006, we began studying stress and cardiovascular risk in incident management team members. Those studies, which continued in 2007 and 2008, showed that sleep deprivation contributed to fatigue, stress, and impaired performance of team members. This report reviews some basic information concerning sleep and sleep deprivation, information that could be useful for incident management team members and wildland firefighters, as well as other agency personnel. Other information on studies of stress in incident management team members can be found in “Wildland Firefighter Health & Safety Report” Nos. 11 and 12.

Monday, December 26, 2016

IGNITE: Embracing Change

We cannot become what we need by remaining what we are. – John C. Maxwell (Wildland firefighter near a pond and waterfall)
We cannot become what we need by remaining what we are. – John C. Maxwell

IGNITE the Spark for Leadership. LIKE and SHARE throughout your networks.
#fireleadership #fireminis

[Photo credit: Sean Lancaster/Twin Falls District - BLM (2016)]

Friday, December 23, 2016

Season's Greetings

On behalf of the NWCG Leadership Subcommittee and the Wildland Fire Leadership Development Program, we want to take a moment to wish our followers the warmest of holidays. May you take this time to reflect upon all that 2016 brought and 2017 has to offer. For those supporting the fire ground, thank you for your service and sacrifice.   Happy holidays to one and all!  [Photo credit: Nicole Oke, Wildland Firefighters Monument, NIFC] (Wreaths and snow adorn the Wildland Fire Monument in Boise, ID)

On behalf of the NWCG Leadership Subcommittee and the Wildland Fire Leadership Development Program, we want to take a moment to wish our followers the warmest of holidays. May you take this time to reflect upon all that 2016 brought and 2017 has to offer. For those supporting the fire ground, thank you for your service and sacrifice.

Happy holidays to one and all!

[Photo credit: Nicole Oke, Wildland Firefighters Monument, NIFC]

Thursday, December 22, 2016

IGNITE: Are you willing to go forward alone?

To be able to lead others, a man must be willing to go forward alone. – Harry Truman (Wildland firefighter walking on a road next to a raging wildfire)

To be able to lead others, a man must be willing to go forward alone. - Harry Truman

IGNITE the Spark for Leadership. LIKE and SHARE throughout your networks.
#fireleadership #fireminis

[Photo credit: Ada County Sheriff's Office, Mile Marker 14 fire (2016)]

Wednesday, December 21, 2016

2017 "Leading Authentically" Campaign

Leading Authentically logo

Wildland Fire Leadership Development Program Mission
“Promote cultural change in the workforce and to emphasize the vital importance of leadership concepts in the wildland fire service by providing educational and leadership development opportunities.”

The Wildland Fire Leadership Development Program recognizes learning, cutting-edge concepts, and tools as a fundamental process in becoming and remaining leaders. Leaders are focused on continual improvement; they seek out and assimilate best practices that improve themselves and their organizations.

Tuesday, December 20, 2016

A Life of Work, Love, and Play

Work, love and play are the great balance wheels of man's being. - Orison Swett Marden (Raging wildland fire in shades of purple, orange and blue)
A career in wildland fire comes with its share of challenges. The biggest may be the ability to manage a life of work, love and play. Emergency responders and their families are well aware of the personal sacrifices made to accomplish the mission.

Monday, December 19, 2016

IGNITE: The Enemy Within

An organization’s deadliest enemies are internal. How we treat each other while we face external challenges determines our ability to win. –Dan Rockwell (Wildland firefighter monitoring forest fire)
An organization’s deadliest enemies are internal. How we treat each other while we face external challenges determines our ability to win. – Dan Rockwell

IGNITE the Spark for Leadership. 
LIKE and SHARE throughout your networks. 
#fireleadership #fireminis
[Photo credit: Midewin IHC]

Thursday, December 15, 2016

IGNITE: Invest in Your People!

Adding value to people with high potential who are hungry to grow is one of the best investments a leader can make. - John Maxwell (Wildland firefighter throwing dirt)

Adding value to people with high potential who are hungry to grow is one of the best investments a leader can make. - John Maxwell

IGNITE the Spark for Leadership. LIKE and SHARE throughout your networks.
#fireleadership #fireminis

[Photo credit: Tyler Churchill/PatRick Environmental]

Tuesday, December 13, 2016

Your Feedback on Training is Needed

NWCG Training System Assessment website QR code

Help NWCG help the wildland fire service! Take a moment to provide feedback into NWCG training development.

"In April 2015, NWCG Training was directed to assess the NWCG Training System (guides, course materials, Position Task Books (PTB), etc.) and provide recommendations for improving system effectiveness and efficiency. The Training System Assessment is being implemented in phases. The intent of this site is to provide information about the project."

Visit the NWCG Training System Assessment website today and provide valuable feedback.

Please share through your spheres of influence!

BIA Staff Attends Gettysburg Staff Ride

Back Row (from left to right): Bob Roberts, Dave Underwood, Garth Fisher, Brig. Gen. Horace Porter, aka Mike Reetz, Mark Jackson, Joe Kafka, Darryl Martinez, and Lucas Minton Bottom Row: Robin White and Robyn Broyles
“I felt like this course will greatly improve leadership as a whole within the BIA fire organization. I learned that communications and relationships are two very important factors in leadership. I am taking back with me the notion that leadership is action and good leaders will take the necessary steps to further the interests of their employees and the mission of the Agency.” – Lucas Minton, Eastern Region Fire Management Officer

Monday, December 12, 2016

Our Values and Principles

Duty Be proficient in your job, both technically ans as a leader. Make sound and timely decisions. Ensure tasks are understood, supervised, and accomplished. Develop your people for the future. Respect Know your people and look out for their well-being. Keep your people informed. Build the team. Employ your people in accordance with their capabilities. Integrity Know yourself and seek improvement. Seek responsibility and accept responsibility for your actions. Set the example.

Duty

  • Be proficient in your job, both technically ans as a leader.
  • Make sound and timely decisions.
  • Ensure tasks are understood, supervised, and accomplished.
  • Develop your people for the future.
Respect
  • Know your people and look out for their well-being.
  • Keep your people informed.
  • Build the team.
  • Employ your people in accordance with their capabilities.
Integrity
  • Know yourself and seek improvement.
  • Seek responsibility and accept responsibility for your actions.
  • Set the example.

Thursday, December 8, 2016

IGNITE: Unlearning is Hard


It is not hard to learn more. What is hard is to unlearn when you discover yourself wrong. – Martin H. Fischer (Firefighter burning a brush pile in the snow)

It is not hard to learn more. What is hard is to unlearn when you discover yourself wrong. – Martin H. Fischer

IGNITE the Spark for Leadership.
LIKE and SHARE throughout your networks.
#fireleadership #fireminis
[Photo credit: NPS]

Tuesday, December 6, 2016

Behavioral Health: Continuing the Conversation

National Fallen Firefighter Foundation "New Goals" poster (on average a firefighter dies in the line of duty every 4 hours...many can be prevented

[This article is a joint effort between Firehouse magazine and the Wildland Fire Leadership Development Program to promote firefighter health and wellness. HELP OTHERS - HELP YOURSELF]



Did you know that firefighter suicides are rarely linked to the firefighter’s experience on one or two big, traumatic calls? The experts tell us it is usually a confluence of small personal and professional stressors, that, over time, become too much to bear. The March Firehouse magazine article “Who Responds to a Firefighter’s Worst Day?” introduces the idea that our emotional reactions to incidents are varied and somewhat unpredictable. Although as a fire service we’ve improved the screening process and assistance we provide to firefighters following traumatic calls, this article underscores that there are many other factors that contribute to stress. Left unresolved, they can cause mental and emotional damage over time.

Monday, December 5, 2016

IGNITE: Leading From...

 It is better to lead from behind and put other in front, especially when you celebrate victory when nice things occur. You take the front line when there is danger. Then people will appreciate your leadership. –Nelson Mandela  (Fire above houses along a mountain slope)

It is better to lead from behind and put other in front, especially when you celebrate victory when nice things occur. You take the front line when there is danger. Then people will appreciate your leadership. – Nelson Mandela 

IGNITE the Spark for Leadership. 
LIKE and SHARE throughout your networks. 
#fireleadership #fireminis
[Photo credit: Kari Greer/USFS]


Thursday, December 1, 2016

IGNITE: Understanding the Needs

Leadership should be born out of the understanding of the needs of those who would be affected by it. – Marian Anderson
Leadership should be born out of the understanding of the needs of those who would be affected by it. – Marian Anderson
IGNITE the Spark for Leadership.
LIKE and SHARE throughout your networks.
#fireleadership #fireminis
[Photo credit: Buck Rock Foundation]

Tuesday, November 29, 2016

Are You the Master of Communication Illusion?

The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place. - George Bernard Shaw
(Credit: BrainyQuote.com)
Since the beginning of time humans have tried to communication more effectively.

Monday, November 28, 2016

IGNITE: The Greatest Mistake

The greatest mistake we make is living in constant fear that we will make one. –John C. Maxwell (Wildland firefighter monitoring a fire along a road)
The greatest mistake we make is living in constant fear that we will make one. – John C. Maxwell
IGNITE the Spark for Leadership.
LIKE and SHARE throughout your networks.
#fireleadership #fireminis
[Photo credit: NPS/Mark Mendonca]

Thursday, November 24, 2016

IGNITE: Fear of Letting Others Down

More than any system of reward and discipline, more than any policy, the fear of letting down respected teammates and peers represents the most effective means of accountability. – Leading in the Wildland Fire Service, page 54 (Wildland fire hotshot crews along a road with fire in the background

More than any system of reward and discipline, more than any policy, the fear of letting down respected teammates and peers represents the most effective means of accountability. – Leading in the Wildland Fire Service, page 54

IGNITE the Spark for Leadership.
LIKE and SHARE throughout your networks.
#fireleadership #fireminis
[Photo credit: Redding IHC, Soberanes fire (2016)]

Wednesday, November 23, 2016

From the Field for the Field Contest Deadline


Applications are due by November 30th for the From the Field for the Field Contest. The contest is part of the annual campaign. This year's theme was "Never Stop Learning." 

We will be launching the 2017 campaign soon! Stay tuned.

For more information, visit our website.

Tuesday, November 22, 2016

In Their Own Words - Hollowway Fire

Picture collage: aerial views of fire shelter deployment site, survivor Chrissy Boone, and close up of shelter and effects
"When the fire came I realized I didn't have my gloves on. I used my neck shroud to hold the shelter down."
Deploying your fire shelter is something none of us wants to do. Unfortunately, deployments do happen. More importantly, having the courage to admit you deployed your shelter and telling your story so others can learn from it is leadership. I am keenly aware that many shelter deployments go unreported. We can learn far more from our successes that our failures. Deploying your fire shelter is NOT a failure!

Take a moment to watch Chrissy Boone's story. Chrissy's courage to talk about your deployment will give you insight and hopefully create a slide you can refer to should you find yourself in a similar situation.



Wildland Fire Lessons Learned Center logo with 14 stars around 3 embedded stars)
Forest Service Technology and Development Program logo (TD with flame in the "D")
Thanks to the USDA Forest Service Technology and Development Program and the Wildland Fire Lessons Learned Center for creating and sharing this video. A special shout out to Chrissy Boone for telling her story.

"Fire Shelter Deployments: Stories and Common Insights" is a program developed by the US Forest Service Missoula Technology and Development Center (MTDC) that will help you understand what you may experience in a fire shelter deployment. Click here fore additional fire shelter information.









Monday, November 21, 2016

IGNITE: Final Responsibility

A leader can give up anything - except final responsibility. –John C. Maxwell  (smoky forest with sun trying to shine through)

A leader can give up anything - except final responsibility. – John C. Maxwell

IGNITE the Spark for Leadership. LIKE and SHARE throughout your networks.
#fireleadership #fireminis
[Photo credit: Tatanka IHC]

Thursday, November 17, 2016

IGNITE: Leadership by Example

The best example of leadership is leadership by example. –Jerry McClain (Wildland firefighters standing in the forest at night with fire in the background)

The best example of leadership is leadership by example. – Jerry McClain

IGNITE the Spark for Leadership.
LIKE and SHARE throughout your networks.
#fireleadership #fireminis

[Photo credit: Cedar Fire (2016)]

Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Does Your Team Suffer from Groupthink?





The time wedge is getting shorter and your team needs to make a decision. You are a very cohesive group. What do you do? Do you hold out on what you feel is "right" or do you conform to the rest of the group for fear of breaking cohesion?

Monday, November 14, 2016

IGNITE: Getting Great Results

If you want great results, you need good people with great talent and awesome attitudes. –Leadership Promises by John Maxwell (Firefighter on the cell phone by his vehicle with fire in the background)
If you want great results, you need good people with great talent and awesome attitudes. – Leadership Promises by John Maxwell
IGNITE the Spark for Leadership. LIKE and SHARE throughout your networks.
#fireleadership #fireminis

[Photo credit: Davis Morris]

Thursday, November 10, 2016

IGNITE: Learning Then Moving On

Learn from the past, just don’t live there. –Mark Miller (Firefighter at edge of the forest with smoke in the background)

Learn from the past, just don’t live there. – Mark Miller

IGNITE the Spark for Leadership.
LIKE and SHARE throughout your networks. #fireleadership #fireminis

[Photo credit: Wyoming Interagency Hotshots]

Tuesday, November 8, 2016

Stress Management

Wildland firefighters exercising with situps and jumpropes
Stress can be described as an imbalance between the demands of our environment and our ability to respond to those demands. Managing stress, or coping, requires adjusting the environment, our personal abilities, or the way we view our world. Situations that seem to be beyond our ability to respond may call for a combination of these coping behaviors.

Coping strategies that work for an individual depend on a host of factors, such as personal references, life experiences, the nature and duration of the challenges, and many others. Physical exercise promotes overall fitness and can help individuals manage stress. Exercise does so both by removing us temporarily from a stressful environment and by helping us to be at our best when we’re dealing with stress.

Monday, November 7, 2016

IGNITE: Help Them Help You

The goal of many leaders is to get people to think more highly of the leaders. The goal of a great leaders is to help people think more highly of themselves. –J. Carla Nortcutt (Firefighters huddled around each other at night with fire burning in the background)
The goal of many leaders is to get people to think more highly of the leaders. The goal of a great leaders is to help people think more highly of themselves. – J. Carla Nortcutt
IGNITE the Spark for Leadership.
LIKE and SHARE throughout your networks. #fireleadership #fireminis
[Photo credit: Kari Greer/USFS, Pioneer fire (2016)]

Thursday, November 3, 2016

IGNITE: Without Trust...

Without trust, there can be no self-confidence, nor confidence in the abilities of others--and no leadership. – Patrick Townsend and Joan Gebhardt (Lightning with sunset in the desert)
Without trust, there can be no self-confidence, nor confidence in the abilities of others--and no leadership. – Patrick Townsend and Joan Gebhardt
IGNITE the Spark for Leadership.
LIKE and SHARE throughout your networks. #fireleadership #fireminis

[Photo credit: UC White Mountain Research Center/Graham Turner]

Tuesday, November 1, 2016

Does Success Fuel Passion or Does Passion Fuel Success?

A great leader's courage to fulfill his vision comes from passion, not position - John Maxwell

When asked why they do what they do, wildland firefighters respond with  variety of responses. Common answers include:
  • I love what I do.
  • I get to see beautiful country.
  • I do it for the money.
  • Firefighting is in my blood.
Defining why we do what we do comes easy for some and a mystery to others. Passion may not reside with employment. Passion may not be something you seek. In fact, purpose and passion are two different things as seen in the quote below.

Purpose is the reason you journey. Passion is the fire that lights your way. ~ Author Unknown

Wildland Fire Leadership Challenge - Digging a Little Deeper
  • Does success fuel passion or does passion fuel success?
  • Is wildland firefighting your purpose or your passion?
  • Did you find your passion or did your passion find you?

Monday, October 31, 2016

50 Years Ago - Loop Fire

Loop fire 1966

On November 1, 1966, the El Cariso Hotshots, a U.S. Forest Service Interregional Wildland Firefighting Crew, was trapped by flames as they worked on a steep hillside in Pacoima Canyon on the Angeles National Forest.

The crew was constructing fireline downhill into a chimney canyon and were within 200 feet of completing their assignment when a sudden shift of winds caused a spot fire directly below where they were working. Within seconds flames raced uphill, engulfing the firefighters in temperatures estimated to reach 2500 degrees F. The fire flashed through the 2,200 foot long chimney canyon in less than one minute, catching the crew while they attempted to reach their safety zones.


Hearld Examiner photo "Fire Just Blew Up"
(Photo Credit: Herald Examiner)
Ten members of the crew perished on the Loop Fire that day. Another two members succumbed from burn injuries in the following days. Most of the nineteen members who survived were critically burned and remained hospitalized for some time.

Much of the knowledge gained about wildland fire has come through the high cost of firefighter lives. Lessons learned from the Loop Fire resulted in improved firefighting equipment, better fire behavior training, and the implementation of new firefighter safety protocols.


(Note: The Loop fire ends at 11:41)

(Interviews with Gordon King and Chuck Hartley)



We Will Never Forget
We will never forget the 12 firefighters who lost their lives in the line of duty on November 1, 1966.
  • Kenneth Barnhill - 19
  • Raymond Chee - 23
  • Fredrick Danner - 18
  • John P. Figlo - 18
  • Joel A. Hill - 19
  • Daniel J. Moore - 21
  • James A. Moreland - 22
  • Carl J. Shilcutt - 26
  • John D. Verdugo - 19
  • William J. Waller - 21
  • Michael R. White - 20
  • Stephen White - 18
Loop Fire Resources

IGNITE: Passing the Torch Forward

"Old fire carry embers that can turn to flame and teach new lessons to later generations." John Maclean (Children dressed as wildland firefighters and spraying water)
"Old fire carry embers that can turn to flame and teach new lessons to later generations." John Maclean
Do your part and share the word.

[Photo credit: BIA Forestry & Wildland Fire Management/Rosebud Agency]

Thursday, October 27, 2016

IGNITE: Timing Your Decision

The timing of your decision is just as important as the decision you make. - John C. Maxwell (Firefighter silhouettes)
The timing of your decision is just as important as the decision you make. - John C. Maxwell
Do your part and share the word.
[Photo credit: Prineville IHC]

Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Can Vulnerability Make Us Safer?

Burning stump

A coworker recently shared a podcast with me that sparked some interesting thoughts.  The podcast was titled “The New Norm,” and was an episode of the NPR “Invisibilia” series. (link to the written story here and the full podcast here)

As I listened to it, I was skeptical of how it might apply to wildland fire organizations and operations. After all, smiling Russians and teary-eyed oil rig workers aren’t normally associated with fire leadership. But then I heard something that stopped my thought process dead in its tracks: by going through an admittedly rough and unpopular process, the group of oil workers reduced their accident rate by 85%.  All of the “fluff” aside, that’s remarkable, and sparked my interest.

Monday, October 24, 2016

IGNITE: Apply and Do

Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Willing is not enough; we must do. –Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (Wildland firefighters walking on a trail, tools in-hand)
Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Willing is not enough; we must do. – Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
Do your part and share the word.
[Photo credit:Plumas IHC]

Thursday, October 20, 2016

IGNITE: Adapting to Change

Intelligence is the ability to adapt to change. –Stephen Hawking (Wildland firefighter watching a helicopter drop water on a fire)
Intelligence is the ability to adapt to change. – Stephen Hawking

Do your part and share the word.
[Photo credit: Redding IHC, Soberanes fire (2016)]

Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Blacksheep VFD Makes an International Impact

Training on Lake Ladoga (on the Finnish border with Russia). Photo credit: Maria Vasilieva
(Training on Lake Ladoga, located on the Finnish border with Russia. Photo credit: Maria Vasilieva.)
Background

  • In 2015, the area around the city of Chita suffered what they call a "firestorm" that consumed 110,000 acres and 400 homes. 
  • The local government in the region often denies and under reports the size of fires.
  • The federal forest service is underfunded and understaffed; so they cannot fight all fires that pop up, especially in Siberia.
  • In 2016, the Irkutsk region experienced timber fires that consumed over 2,000,000 acres unchecked.

Monday, October 17, 2016

IGNITE: Leadership is a Choice

You cannot push anyone up the ladder unless the person is willing to climb. – Andrew Carnegie
Do your part and share the word.
[Photo credit:Rob Powell, Hayden fire (2016)]

Thursday, October 13, 2016

IGNITE: Obligations and Responsibilities

The freedom to do your own thing ends when you have obligations and responsibilities. –Lou Holtz (line of fire vehicles; one with a flag in the back)
The freedom to do your own thing ends when you have obligations and responsibilities. - Lou Holtz
Do your part and share the word.
[Photo credit: State of Alaska, Pioneer Peak IHC]

Tuesday, October 11, 2016

The Value of the Work


The Value of the Work from The Smokey Generation on Vimeo.

Why do you work? Do you get value from what you do?

The answers to these question vary among fire personnel. Adam Hernandez shares his reflections on the values he has experienced as a hotshot.

Kudos to Adam for applying lessons and the core values of duty, respect, and integrity well beyond the fireline and into his personal life.


What is your story? We challenge you to become a part of this amazing project and share your leadership stories. Bethany Hannah began The Smokey Generation: A Wildland Fire Oral History and Digital Storytelling Project for her master's thesis. All members of the wildland fire service, not just hotshots, can share their stories by following her example. Click here for potential leadership questions. Visit The Smokey Generation website for complete information.

The Smokey Generation logo

Monday, October 10, 2016

IGNITE: Resiliency

Do not judge me by my successes, judge me by how many times I fell down and got back up again. –Nelson Mandela  (Wildland firefighters walking into the sunset
Do not judge me by my successes, judge me by how many times I fell down and got back up again. – Nelson Mandela
Do your part and share the word.
[Photo credit: Kyle Miller/Wyoming IHC]

Thursday, October 6, 2016

IGNITE: The Art of Leadership

The art of leadership requires a constant interchange of theory and application. The art also includes being able to view the larger picture—discerning how to turn a weakness into a strength, gauging what is and is not within our control. –Leading in the Wildland Fire Service, page 9 (Fire with sun shining through smoke, producing an orange hue.)
The art of leadership requires a constant interchange of theory and application. The art also includes being able to view the larger picture—discerning how to turn a weakness into a strength, gauging what is and is not within our control. – Leading in the Wildland Fire Service, page 9
Do your part and share the word.
[Photo credit: Kari Greer/USFS]

Tuesday, October 4, 2016

FirstNet - Coming to an Area Near You

The tragedy of 9/11 and technological advancements are influencing the way we respond to and engage emergency operations. The First Responder Network (FirstNet) provides the mechanism to provide emergency responders with real-time information and connections to enhance response efforts.

Monday, October 3, 2016

IGNITE: Power for Purpose

You are the one with the power to contribute meaning to your work. –Karissa Thacker (Wildland firefighters standing at rest)

You are the one with the power to contribute meaning to your work. – Karissa Thacker

Do your part and share the word.
[Photo credit: National Park Service]

Thursday, September 29, 2016

IGNITE: Difficult Right Over Easy Wrong

Choose the difficult right over the easy wrong. –Wildland Fire Leadership (wildland fire within the wildland urban interface. Firefighters in back yard of home.)

Choose the difficult right over the easy wrong. – Wildland Fire Leadership

Do your part and share the word.
[Photo credit: Star Fire Protection District, Table Rock Fire (2016]

Tuesday, September 27, 2016

New Feature Added to the LLC Product List


We are honored to help the Wildland Fire Lessons Learned Center (LLC) launch a new product. LLC staff have been working diligently to expand into the podcast arena. Exhibit your care for those around you – lead with compassion by triggering learning.


Monday, September 26, 2016

IGNITE: Performing to Our Potential

If we all did the things we are capable of doing, we would astound ourselves. –Thomas Edison (Firefighters hiking)

If we all did the things we are capable of doing, we would astound ourselves. 
– Thomas Edison

Do your part and share the word.
[Photo credit: Folsom Lake Veterans Fire Crew]

Thursday, September 22, 2016

IGNITE: Change Your Thoughts - Change Your World

Change your thoughts and you change your world. – Norman Vincent Peale (Firefighters standing, smoke all around)

Change your thoughts and you change your world. – Norman Vincent Peale

Do your part and share the word.
[Photo credit: Wyoming IHC]

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

In the Middle of a Burnout

Candle burning at both ends
(Photo credit: Photodisc)
"And there I was...in the middle of a burnout."

No, not a wildland fire burnout. The burnout I found myself in was when an individual feels "overwhelmed, emotionally drained, and unable to meet constant demands." (HelpGuide.org) I was burning the candle at both ends and didn't think I would get burned.

Monday, September 19, 2016

IGNITE: Influence, Not Authority

The key to successful leadership today is influence, not authority. –Ken Blanchard

The key to successful leadership today is influence, not authority.  – Ken Blanchard

Do your part and share the word.
[Photo credit: Star Fire Protection District, Table Rock Fire (2016)]

Thursday, September 15, 2016

IGNITE: The Past

Successful leaders make the past a platform, not an anchor. – Dan Rockwell

Successful leaders make the past a platform, not an anchor. – Dan Rockwell

[Photo credit: Baker City IHC]

Tuesday, September 13, 2016

IGNITING Beyond Borders

Mentoring and sharing knowledge, skills and abilities is part of being a mission-driven culture. San Diego Fire-Rescue Department (SDFD) is leading by example and sharing their service for the common good. In the video below, the common good stretches international boundaries to the firefighting brotherhood of Saudi Aramco in Saudi Arabia.



Service for the Common Good
Service for the common good is at the heart of the Mission-Driven Culture; it is the core value that motivates people to dedicate their time, talent, and energy to become members of incident organizations.

Although staff members consistently voice a strong motivation to serve the public, individuals express this commitment differently, and the resulting differences in behavior and attitude can generate friction and thwart concentric action.

At the core of this value is a commitment to ensuring that all actions and decisions promote the desired team result, which is the staff’s collective interpretation of how to serve the common good.

© Mission-Centered Solutions. Used with permission.

San Diego Fire Rescue Department logo - lighthouse next to a water with mountains in the background