Thursday, May 25, 2017

IGNITE: Bring Your Best

Bring your best every day. (Wildland fire engine with sunset in background)

Bring your best every day.

[Photo credit: Alex Galt, USFWS]

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Scott Anderson Honored for Lead by Example Award for Motivation and Vision

Josh Haney congratulating Scott Anderson on his Lead by Example Award

Scott Anderson
BLM Training Specialist (NWCG)
National Interagency Fire Center
Honored for Motivation and Vision

Scott Anderson has been selected as one of the recipients for the 2016 Paul Gleason Lead by Example award. Three individuals and two groups from across the wildland fire service have been chosen to receive this national award.

The award was created by the NWCG Leadership Committee to remember Paul Gleason’s contributions to the wildland fire service. During a career spanning five decades, Paul was a dedicated student of fire, a teacher of fire, and a leader of firefighters. The intent of this award is to recognize individuals or groups who exhibit this same spirit and who exemplify the wildland fire leadership values and principles. Scott's work in support of the Wildland Fire Leadership Development Program has been a demonstration of motivation and vision.

Scott was recognized for his involvement with the Wildland Fire Safety Training Annual Refresher program. Scott's undying commitment to making a difference through thoughtful, meaningful safety content personifies the art of leadership.

Take 5 @ 2 logo - clock at 2 o'clock embedded in a hand
The success of the WFSTAR program is a testament to your courage, strong leadership, and commitment to the safety of the ground firefighter. Scott's fearless vision and incredible creativity reached “outside the box.” Through his example, students of fire have been inspired to go beyond the ordinary and pursue excellence through innovation and creativity. Scott's example will live on for years to come.

Congratulations, Scott, on a job well done!

Paul Gleason Lead by Example award solicitation
Work boots

Monday, May 22, 2017

IGNITE: The True Spirit of Conversation

The true spirit of conversation consists in building on another person's observation, not overturning it. - Edward George Earle Lytton Bulwer-Lytton
The true spirit of conversation consists in building on another person's observation, not overturning it. - Edward George Earle Lytton Bulwer-Lytton

[Photo credit: Cedar Fire (2016)]

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Diego Mendiola Receives Lead by Example Award for Mentoring and Teamwork



Diego Mendiola holding his Paul Gleason Lead by Example Award for mentoring and teamwork
Diego Mendiola
Hotshot Superintendent
Zigzag Ranger District, USFS
Honored for Mentoring and Teamwork
Diego Mendiola has been selected as one of the recipients for the 2016 Paul Gleason Lead by Example award. Three individuals and two groups from across the wildland fire service have been chosen to receive this national award.

The award was created by the NWCG Leadership Committee to remember Paul Gleason’s contributions to the wildland fire service. During a career spanning five decades, Paul was a dedicated student of fire, a teacher of fire, and a leader of firefighters. The intent of this award is to recognize individuals or groups who exhibit this same spirit and who exemplify the wildland fire leadership values and principles. Diego’s work in support of the Wildland Fire Leadership Development Program has been a demonstration of mentoring and teamwork.

Diego Mendiola award presentation
Diego was recognized for his accomplishments as a valued mentor and team builder. Over the course of 30 years, he created a culture embodying the values of duty, respect, and integrity. With a humble personality and positive leadership style, he showed others what right looks like.

Mentoring and building the team were two of Diego's greatest strengths. His passion for duty and compassion for people surpassed fire and entered the realm of life skills. Diego's legacy will live on through those he led and served.

Congratulations, Diego, on a job well done!

Paul Gleason Lead by Example Award solicitation
Work boots




Thursday, May 11, 2017

IGNITE: Ripple Effects of Leadership

A leader's accomplishments are measured in lifetimes. Our character, decisions, and actions create powerful ripple effects that continue to influence people and organizations long after we are gone. - Leading in the Wildland Fire Service, p. 67 [lightning strike in the desert at dusk]
A leader's accomplishments are measured in lifetimes. Our character, decisions, and actions create powerful ripple effects that continue to influence people and organizations long after we are gone. - Leading in the Wildland Fire Service, p. 67
Share through your spheres of influence.

[Photo credit: Seedskadee and Cokeville Meadows Nation Wildlife Refuge/Tom Koerner]

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Cottrell and Myers Earn Lead by Example Award for Mentoring and Teamwork

Dan Cottrell, Smokejumper Foreman
Debbie Myers, Program Support Assistant
Aerial Fire Depot, Region 1, US Forest Service
Honored for Mentoring and Teamwork

Edmund Ward (who brought Deb and Dan into the Smokejumper program), Bill Miller, Tory Kendrick (Acting Missoula Smokejumper Base Manager receiving the award on behalf of Dan Cottrell, who is on fire assignment in the Southeast), Deb Myers (Currently working with the Anaconda Job Corps program) and Paul Chamberlin (previous Gleason Award recipient from the Northern Rockies)
Dan Cottrell and Debbie Myers have been selected as one of the recipients for the 2016 Paul Gleason Lead by Example award. Three individuals and two groups from across the wildland fire service have been chosen to receive this national award.

Molly and Dan Cottrell
The award was created by the NWCG Leadership Committee to remember Paul Gleason’s contributions to the wildland fire service. During a career spanning five decades, Paul was a dedicated student of fire, a teacher of fire, and a leader of firefighters. The intent of this award is to recognize individuals or groups who exhibit this same spirit and who exemplify the wildland fire leadership values and principles. Dan and Debbie's work in support of the Wildland Fire Leadership Development Program has been a demonstration of mentoring and teamwork.

Dan and Debbie were recognized for theirinvolvement with the Lead Forward Program. Creation of a program to recruit, train, and place well-qualified veteran candidates into the workforce in Region 1 was progressive and has brought about positive organizational change beyond the local level.

The success of the Lead Forward Program is a testament to their courage, strong leadership, and commitment to building the team. Dan and Debbie's vision to integrate veterans into the wildland fire service was an excellent example of mentoring and teamwork and provides an inspiration for years to come. Through their generosity and example, veterans have a sense of purpose and continued service.

Congratulations, Dan and Debbie, on a job well done!

Paul Gleason Lead by Example award solicitation
Work boots

Monday, May 8, 2017

IGNITE: Synergy!

Teamwork requires that everyone's efforts flow in a single direction. - Pat Riley [Wildland firefighters moving a stump; two on each side trying to roll it.]
Teamwork requires that everyone's efforts flow in a single direction. - Pat Riley

Share through your sphere of influence.

[Photo credit: Kari Greer/USFS]

Thursday, May 4, 2017

IGNITE: Leadership is Learning

Leadership is not an expertise. Leadership is a constant education. - Simon Sinek (wildfire in California desert)

Leadership is not an expertise. 
Leadership is a constant education. - Simon Sinek

[Photo credit: Captain Bryan Hoverman, San Bernadino County FD]

Tuesday, May 2, 2017

South Puget Sound Wildland Team Earns Lead by Example Award for Initiative and Innovation

Left to right: Hilary Franz, Washington State Commissioner of Public Lands; Matt Caldwell; Terry Jewell; Kevin Dohnam, previous LBE recipient; Sean Kibbe; Don Melton, SPS Fire District Manager; Bryan Scholz, past LBE recipient; Charley Burns; Brian Looper; Mark Stanford, NWCG Leadership Subcommittee
Left to right: Hilary Franz, Washington State Commissioner of Public Lands; Matt Caldwell; Terry Jewell; Kevin Dohnam, previous LBE recipient; Sean Kibbe; Don Melton, SPS Fire District Manager; Bryan Scholz, past LBE recipient; Charley Burns; Brian Looper; Mark Stanford, NWCG Leadership Subcommittee
South Puget Sound Wildland Team
Washington Department of Natural Resources
South Puget Sound Region
Honored for Initiative and Innovation

The South Puget Sound Wildland Team has been selected as one of the recipients for the 2016 Paul Gleason Lead by Example award. Three individuals and two groups from across the wildland fire service have been chosen to receive this national award.

Monday, May 1, 2017

IGNITE: Doing the Right Things

Efficiency is doing things right effectiveness is doing the right things. - Peter Drucker (thunderstorm with lightning)
Efficiency is doing things right effectiveness is doing the right things. - Peter Drucker
[Photo source: Jupiter Images]

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Risko Earns Lead By Example Award for Initiative and Innovation

Left to Right: Jeff Atwater, Florida Chief Financial Officer/State Fire Marshal; John Fish, FFS, Chief of Forest Protection George Risko, FFS Fire Training Officer; Jim Karels, Florida State Forester/Director of the FFS; Julius Halas, Director, Division of State Fire Marshal; Mike Joyner, Assistant Commissioner and Chief of Staff, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services

George Risko
Fire Training Officer
Florida Forest Service
Honored for Initiative and Innovation

George Risko has been selected as one of the recipients for the 2016 Paul Gleason Lead by Example award. Three individuals and two groups from across the wildland fire service have been chosen to receive this national award.

The award was created by the NWCG Leadership Committee to remember Paul Gleason’s contributions to the wildland fire service. During a career spanning five decades, Paul was a dedicated student of fire, a teacher of fire, and a leader of firefighters. The intent of this award is to recognize individuals or groups who exhibit this same spirit and who exemplify the wildland fire leadership values and principles. George's work in support of the Wildland Fire Leadership Development Program has been a demonstration of initiative and innovation.

George was recognized for his ability to serve as a respected role model and teacher of wildland firefighters. As an avid supporter of reading and learning, he has inspired others to go beyond the conventional classroom to develop their leadership skills and change culture. George's humble, yet powerful, leadership example has produced huge benefits within Florida Forest Service and beyond.

Additionally, George was commended on his passion for leadership and compassion for those you lead. George's military background provides insight into the very roots of the Wildland Fire Leadership Development Program. The relationships he continues to foster with military partners provide an innovative development opportunity for those he leads and serves.

Congratulations, George, on a job well done!
The reactions of the supervisors tell the story--George had no idea the award was for him. 
Paul Gleason Lead by Example award solicitation
Work boots

Monday, April 24, 2017

2017 Position Task Book Field Review Needs You!


2017 Task Book Field Review cover

NWCG is updating Position Task Books!  

Help make them the best they can be at https://sites.google.com/site/2017ptbfieldreview/home.

IGNITE: Working Together!

 None of us can accomplish alone what is possible when we are working together! - Chery Gegelman  [Photo credit: Plumas IHC/USFS]
None of us can accomplish alone what is possible when we are working together! - Chery Gegelman
[Photo credit: Plumas IHC/USFS]

Thursday, April 20, 2017

IGNITE: Fear of the Mistake

The greatest mistake we make is living in constant fear that we will make one. – John C. Maxwell Crew walking up a slope
The greatest mistake we make is living in constant fear that we will make one. – John C. Maxwell
IGNITE the Spark for Leadership. LIKE and SHARE throughout your networks.
#fireleadership #fireminis

[Photo: National Park Service]

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Resiliency Through Suffering: Lessons from Wildland Firefighting (After the Fact)

The ultimate team result is resilience: teams that can bounce back when problems or errors threaten cohesion and synergy. - Leading in the Wildland Fire Service, p. 55
I grew up in a city. I had divorced parents and the first time I slept outside (on purpose, without alcohol being a factor) was my first fire on the Roosevelt National Forest. Needless to say, I didn’t really fit the mold of the prototypical wildland firefighter, if there is one. I had a crazy engine captain who came from SoCal, who taught me to be a decent firefighter mainly through sarcasm and hard PT hikes and runs. Although I sucked at pretty much everything in retrospect, I somehow managed to convince myself I was awesome at everything, just like 99% of all other 18-24 year olds do.

Monday, April 17, 2017

IGNITE: Hopes not Fears

May your choices reflect your hopes, not your fears. – Nelson Mandela  Wildland firefighters on a ridge watching an airtanker drop
May your choices reflect your hopes, not your fears. – Nelson Mandela

IGNITE the Spark for Leadership. LIKE and SHARE throughout your networks.
#fireleadership #fireminis

[Photo: Folsom Lake Veterans' Fire Crew]

Thursday, April 13, 2017

IGNITE: The True Spirit of Conversation

The true spirit of conversation consists in building on another person's observation, not overturning it. - Edward George Earle Lytton Bulwer-Lytton
The true spirit of conversation consists in building on another person's observation, not overturning it. - Edward George Earle Lytton Bulwer-Lytton 
IGNITE the Spark for Leadership. LIKE and SHARE throughout your networks. #fireleadership #fireminis 

[Photo credit: Cedar Fire (2016)]

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Leadership at the Lowest Levels

Leadership is the art of influencing people in order to achieve a result. The most essential element for success in the wildland fire service is good leadership.
Leadership is not about a title. The wildland fire service prides itself on leadership at all levels. In this Smokey Generation video, Lee Miller shares a leadership success story of his transport driver having the courage to lead up.

We challenge you to watch the video and dig a little deeper into leading up.

Thursday, April 6, 2017

IGNITE: Getting and Giving

You can get everything in life you want if you help enough other people get what they want. – Zig Ziglar (wildland firefighters hiking up a hill)
You can get everything in life you want if you help enough other people get what they want. – Zig Ziglar
IGNITE the Spark for Leadership. LIKE and SHARE throughout your networks.
#fireleadership #fireminis

[Photo credit: Feather River Hotshots]

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

Have We Done Enough?


 
As a member of the wildland fire service or a friend or family member of someone who is, you know that the Fourth of July weekend is always a busy time of the year for firefighters. This particular holiday is not one many of us get to celebrate. In fact, most of us are supporting fireline operations in one fashion or another.

Monday, April 3, 2017

IGNITE: Beyond the Challenge

Give yourself an even greater challenge than the one you are trying to master and you will develop the powers necessary to overcome the original difficulty. – William Bennett (silhouette of firefighters)
Give yourself an even greater challenge than the one you are trying to master and you will develop the powers necessary to overcome the original difficulty. – William Bennett
IGNITE the Spark for Leadership. LIKE and SHARE throughout your networks.
#fireleadership #fireminis

[Photo credit: Cedar Fire 2016]

Thursday, March 30, 2017

IGNITE: The Power of the Resilient Team

The ultimate team result is resilience: teams that can bounce back when problems or errors threaten cohesion and synergy. - Leading in the Wildland Fire Service, p. 55)
The ultimate team result is resilience: teams that can bounce back when problems or errors threaten cohesion and synergy. - Leading in the Wildland Fire Service, p. 55)
IGNITE the Spark for Leadership. LIKE and SHARE throughout your networks.
#fireleadership #fireminis

[Photo credit: Josh Neighbors/South Dakota Wildland Fire]

Tuesday, March 28, 2017

From the Reading List - Extreme Ownership



One of the books chosen for the 2017 Professional Reading List was Extreme Ownership by  Jocko Willink and Leif Babin. Through all of last season, and over the winter, we heard from folks in the field recommending this book to us... So to all who recommended it, thanks!

For me, what really sets Extreme Ownership apart as a stellar book on leadership is its applicability... It doesn't matter if you're the Chief or a rookie, there's something in here that you can apply in your everyday life. Running a complex program? Check, there are lessons to be shared about how to thrive in complex environments. Rookie on a hotshot crew? Check, there are lessons to be had about self leadership and owning your actions. Something in between? You can bet there's a way to apply ideas and concepts from the book in your specific situation.

Monday, March 27, 2017

IGNITE: Better Followers = Better Leaders

Better followers beget better leaders. - Barbara Kellerman


Better followers beget better leaders. - Barbara Kellerman

IGNITE the Spark for Leadership. LIKE and SHARE throughout your networks.
#fireleadership #fireminis

[Photo credit: Jeri Peterson/ODF]

Thursday, March 23, 2017

The Best Investment

"Investing in yourself is the best investment you will ever make. It will not only improve your life, it will improve the lives of all those around you." - Robin S. Sharma (blue skies, trees and smoke column)
"Investing in yourself is the best investment you will ever make. It will not only improve your life, it will improve the lives of all those around you." - Robin S. Sharma

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Living the Passion


Living the Passion from The Smokey Generation on Vimeo.

Gina Papke is passionate about her career in wildland firefighting. Do you have the same level of engagement with and passion for your job?

Wildland Fire Leadership Challenge - Digging a Little Deeper
  • Where are you located on Integro Leadership Institute's The Passion Pyramid™?
  • Where would you like to be and how do you intend to get to that location on the pyramid?

The Passion Pyramid



What is your story? We challenge you to become a part of this amazing  project and share your leadership stories. Bethany Hannah began The Smokey Generation: A Wildland Fire Oral History and Digital Storytelling Project for her master's thesis. All members of the wildland fire service, not just hotshots, can share their stories by following her example. Click here for potential leadership questions. Visit The Smokey Generation website for complete information.

The Smokey Generation logo

Monday, March 20, 2017

Wildland Fire Leadership Values and Principles

DUTY  Be proficient in your job, both technically and as a leader. Make sound and timely decisions. Ensure tasks are understood, supervised, and accomplished. Develop your people for the future. RESPECT  Know your people and look out for their well-being. Keep your people informed. Build the team. Employ your people in accordance with their capabilities. INTEGRITY Know yourself and seek improvement. Seek responsibility and accept responsibility for your actions. Set the example.

The Wildland Fire Leadership Values and Principles are our foundation and resulted from the sacrifices of those before you. Take a moment to read them, commit them to memory, and lead well in their honor.

DUTY
  • Be proficient in your job, both technically and as a leader.
  • Make sound and timely decisions.
  • Ensure tasks are understood, supervised, and accomplished.
  • Develop your people for the future.
RESPECT
  • Know your people and look out for their well-being.
  • Keep your people informed.
  • Build the team.
  • Employ your people in accordance with their capabilities.
INTEGRITY
  • Know yourself and seek improvement.
  • Seek responsibility and accept responsibility for your actions.
  • Set the example.
Wildland Fire Leadership Challenge - Digging a Little Deeper
Wildland firefighters putting fire on the ground at night and copy of "Leading in the Wildland Fire Service"


Thursday, March 16, 2017

IGNITE: Leaders Need Guiding Principles

Leaders without guiding principles are undependable followers. –Dan Rockwell [Photo: Stefanie Garcia/National Park Service]
Leaders without guiding principles are undependable followers. – Dan Rockwell
IGNITE the Spark for Leadership. LIKE and SHARE throughout your networks.
#fireleadership #fireminis

[Photo: Stefanie Garcia/National Park Service]

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

When Words Harm

string can phone
(Photo credit: borzaya/Thinkstock)
Since the beginning of time, humans have tried to "break the code" of effective communication. Yet even with research and technological advancements, the fact remains that communication and relationships between communicators fail because of what we say and how we say it. Words matter!

Achieving Greatness through Action

LEAD Time logo (the "A" in LEAD is the three-peaked leadership mountain with path leading to up with duty, respect, and integrity)

A Bias for Action
Leaders in the wildland fire service are not only empowered but also duty-bound to act on a situation that is within our power to affect, even without direction from above.

Monday, March 13, 2017

2017 Professional Reading List is Live!



The WFDLP is issuing the 2017 reading challenge!  The books chosen as the primary focus for this year are: Extreme Ownership by Jocko Willink and Leif Babin; Team of Teams by retired Army General Stanley McChrystal; The Art of Authenticity by Karissa Thacker; and Resilience by Eric Greitens.

Integrity: Set the Example

Integrity: Set the Example  Share the hazards and hardships with your subordinates. Don't show discouragement when facing setbacks. Choose the difficult right over the easy wrong.  [Photo credit: Kari Greer/USFS]
Integrity: Set the Example
  • Share the hazards and hardships with your subordinates.
  • Don't show discouragement when facing setbacks.
  • Choose the difficult right over the easy wrong.
[Photo credit: Kari Greer/USFS]

Thursday, March 9, 2017

Integrity: Seek Responsibility and Accept Responsibility for Your Actions

Integrity: Seek Responsibility and Accept Responsibility for Your Actions Accept full responsibility for and correct poor team performance. Credit subordinates for good performance. Keep your superiors informed of your actions. [Photo credit: Folsom Lake Hand Crew]
Integrity: Seek Responsibility and Accept Responsibility for Your Actions

  • Accept full responsibility for and correct poor team performance.
  • Credit subordinates for good performance.
  • Keep your superiors informed of your actions.
[Photo credit: Folsom Lake Hand Crew]

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Leading on the Spectrum

spectrum of colors
(Photo credit: Kim Steele/Thinkstock)
Spectrums and scales can be found throughout the wildland fire environment. Here are a couple.

Monday, March 6, 2017

Integrity: Know Yourself and Seek Improvement

Integrity: Know Yourself and Seek Improvement

  • Know the strengths/weaknesses in your character and skill level.
  • Ask questions of peers and supervisors.
  • Actively listen to feedback from subordinates.
[Photo credit: Kari Greer/USFS]

Thursday, March 2, 2017

Respect: Employ Your Subordinates in Accordance with Their Capabilities

Respect: Employ your subordinates in accordance with their capabilities. Observe human behavior as well as fire behavior. Provide early warning to subordinates of tasks they will be responsible for. Consider team experience, fatigue, and physical limitations when accepting assignments. [Photo credit: Brian Childs]
Respect: Employ your subordinates in accordance with their capabilities.

  • Observe human behavior as well as fire behavior.
  • Provide early warning to subordinates of tasks they will be responsible for.
  • Consider team experience, fatigue, and physical limitations when accepting assignments.
[Photo credit: Brian Childs]

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Are Your Senses Tricking You?

Situation Awareness Cycle: Observation and Communication (input). Gather information, change, perception, no change, repeat. (cycle around an eye)
Making Sound and Timely Decisions

To make sound and timely decisions, fire leaders assess the situation, seek out relevant information, weigh options, make judgments, and initiate action as required to create a positive outcome within inevitable time constraints.

Respect: Build the Team

Build the Team Conduct frequent debriefings with the team to identify lessons learned. Recognize accomplishments and reward them appropriately. Apply disciplinary measures equally.
Respect: Build the Team

  • Conduct frequent debriefings with the team to identify lessons learned.
  • Recognize accomplishments and reward them appropriately.
  • Apply disciplinary measures equally.
[Photo credit: Kari Greer/USFS]

Thursday, February 23, 2017

Respect: Keep Your Subordinates Informed

Respect: Keep your subordinates informed. • Provide accurate and timely briefings. • Give the reason (intent) for assignments and tasks. • Make yourself available to answer questions at appropriate times.  [Photo credit: Folsom Lake Hand Crew]
Respect: Keep your subordinates informed.• Provide accurate and timely briefings.
• Give the reason (intent) for assignments and tasks.
• Make yourself available to answer questions at appropriate times.

[Photo credit: Folsom Lake Hand Crew]